Journey Through the Yellowstone National Park and Northwestern Wyoming

Journey Through the Yellowstone

Description

This collection of six images comes from a book documenting the voyage of then-President of the United States, Chester Arthur, to Yellowstone in 1883. Arthur’s travels were both a means of publicizing the new national park system – press and other people accompanying the president occupied the tents pictured in the top left image – and of rejuvenating his health, which had suffered since assuming the presidency. Only 11 years after the designation of the first national park, the trope of wilderness imbued with healing powers as a foil to the toxicity of cities was in full effect.

The bottom left and center images depict the Wind River Canyon, in Wyoming, in what is today the Wind River Reservation of Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes. It is the homeland of the people depicted in the top right image, people who had meaningful relationships with the Wind River bioregion passed on through generations. However, the adjacency of these seemingly incongruent images--of tents, Native people, and vacated landscapes--suggest that, indigenous people are somehow an artifact of the natural environment, simultaneously place-based and removable. Just four year after the Shoshone and Arapaho encountered Arthur on their lands, the United States government passed the Dawes Act, which allotted a specific amount of territory per nuclear (cisheternormative) Native family and sold the remaining treaty lands to white settlers. These photographs are evidence of the ideology that promoted the destruction of indigenous kinship systems and communal relationships to land through allotment policies, pushed by Arthur.

MetaData

Dublin Core

Title

Journey Through the Yellowstone National Park and Northwestern Wyoming

Subject

Chester Arthur, Yellowstone

Description

This collection of six images comes from a book documenting the voyage of then-President of the United States, Chester Arthur, to Yellowstone in 1883. Arthur’s travels were both a means of publicizing the new national park system – press and other people accompanying the president occupied the tents pictured in the top left image – and of rejuvenating his health, which had suffered since assuming the presidency. Only 11 years after the designation of the first national park, the trope of wilderness imbued with healing powers as a foil to the toxicity of cities was in full effect.

The bottom left and center images depict the Wind River Canyon, in Wyoming, in what is today the Wind River Reservation of Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes. It is the homeland of the people depicted in the top right image, people who had meaningful relationships with the Wind River bioregion passed on through generations. However, the adjacency of these seemingly incongruent images--of tents, Native people, and vacated landscapes--suggest that, indigenous people are somehow an artifact of the natural environment, simultaneously place-based and removable. Just four year after the Shoshone and Arapaho encountered Arthur on their lands, the United States government passed the Dawes Act, which allotted a specific amount of territory per nuclear (cisheternormative) Native family and sold the remaining treaty lands to white settlers. These photographs are evidence of the ideology that promoted the destruction of indigenous kinship systems and communal relationships to land through allotment policies, pushed by Arthur.

Creator

Frank Jay Haynes, American, 1853-1921

Source

Library of Congress (LOC)

Publisher

N/A

Date

1883

Contributor

G Laster

Rights

Public domain

Relation

Other Media

Format

16 x 22 cm.

Language

En-US

Type

Photograph

Identifier

LC-DIG-ppmsca-35343

Coverage

Alternative Title

Journey Through the Yellowstone

Date Created

February 20, 2018

Date Modified

March 10, 2018

Access Rights

Public domain

License

N/A

Has Part

N/A

Is Referenced By

N/A

References

N/A

Medium

Albumen silver prints on card stock

Bibliographic Citation

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002696055/

Spatial Coverage

Yellowstone

Temporal Coverage

19th Century

Audience

General audience

Rights Holder

https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/index.html

Citation

Frank Jay Haynes, American, 1853-1921, “Journey Through the Yellowstone National Park and Northwestern Wyoming,” Park Culture, accessed February 25, 2021, http://parkculture.org/items/show/130.

Collection

Geolocation