Redwoods, Bull Creek Flat, Northern California

Redwoods, Bull Creek Flat

Description

Ansel Easton Adams was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black and white landscapes of the American West are well known and commonly used in books, calendars, and on the internet. This photograph of California Redwoods by Adams gives the popular myth of a beautiful and expansive wilderness a more depressing tone. It does however, continue the idea of a pristine wilderness. The land in this photo looks untouched, completely devoid of human interaction. The dark colors Adams uses make nature seem ominous and less inviting than other photographs of national parks, however. It presents a mysterious feeling and begs the viewer to look further into the background of the photograph. Adams’s work is characterized by the intense sharpness of his prints. He worked in tandem with artist Fred Archer, and together they developed the Zone System. This allowed Adams to determine proper exposure and adjust the contrast of the final print. The resulting clarity and depth characterizes many of his photographs. The clarity in the trees and every small piece of bark is easy to see. The background is dark, but still has some detail and is not simply pure black. Adams focuses heavily on the foreground, throwing every natural detail into relief. The dark gray leaves and low-lying bushes are starkly contrasted with the much lighter trunks. This object presents an overall contrast to the common romanticism associated with the national parks.

MetaData

Dublin Core

Title

Redwoods, Bull Creek Flat, Northern California

Subject

Redwoods, Bull Creek Flat, Northern California, photograph, Ansel Adams

Description

Ansel Easton Adams was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black and white landscapes of the American West are well known and commonly used in books, calendars, and on the internet. This photograph of California Redwoods by Adams gives the popular myth of a beautiful and expansive wilderness a more depressing tone. It does however, continue the idea of a pristine wilderness. The land in this photo looks untouched, completely devoid of human interaction. The dark colors Adams uses make nature seem ominous and less inviting than other photographs of national parks, however. It presents a mysterious feeling and begs the viewer to look further into the background of the photograph. Adams’s work is characterized by the intense sharpness of his prints. He worked in tandem with artist Fred Archer, and together they developed the Zone System. This allowed Adams to determine proper exposure and adjust the contrast of the final print. The resulting clarity and depth characterizes many of his photographs. The clarity in the trees and every small piece of bark is easy to see. The background is dark, but still has some detail and is not simply pure black. Adams focuses heavily on the foreground, throwing every natural detail into relief. The dark gray leaves and low-lying bushes are starkly contrasted with the much lighter trunks. This object presents an overall contrast to the common romanticism associated with the national parks.

Creator

Ansel Easton Adams, American, 1902–1984

Source

Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG)

Publisher

N/A

Date

1960

Contributor

Brandon Cobb

Rights

Yale University Art Gallery, Ansel Adams Estate

Relation

Photographs

Format

23.8 x 28.9 cm (9 3/8 x 11 3/8 in. )

Language

En-US

Type

Photograph

Identifier

2001.59.1

Coverage

Redwoods

Alternative Title

Redwoods, Bull Creek Flat

Date Created

February 22, 2018

Access Rights

Copyright

Medium

Gelatin silver print

Bibliographic Citation

https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/81099

Spatial Coverage

Redwoods

Temporal Coverage

Northern California, 20th Century

Accrual Method

Gift of Mrs. George R. Rowland in memory of George R. Rowland, B.A. 1933

Audience

General audience

Rights Holder

https://artgallery.yale.edu/about/rights-and-reproductions

Citation

Ansel Easton Adams, American, 1902–1984, “Redwoods, Bull Creek Flat, Northern California,” Park Culture, accessed March 6, 2021, http://parkculture.org/items/show/172.

Collection

Geolocation