Chris, Campground Ranger, Tuolumne Meadows Campground

Chris, Campground Ranger

Description

Though passionate about the outdoors, photographer Michael Matthew Woodlee’s interest in national parks lies specifically in the people who inhabit them. His series Yos-e-mite features the workers and volunteers that study and maintain the park. They form their own communities within the spaces, comprising a distinctly human element of the vast natural expanse. He explores how the “Yosemites” shape the culture of the park and how, in turn, the park shapes them. Chris, Campground Ranger, Tuolumne Meadows Campground points an intimate lens toward one such Yosemite worker. Chris, the ranger, stares out from his post at a campsite and fills the center of the photograph. The close framing excludes reference to the famous landscape, which must surround him. By centering Chris’s gaze and cropping the photograph close to his subject, Woodlee puts the viewer in conversation with Chris, asking us to come to know this member of the park community and recognize the integral presence of people, particularly campers, in the park. Crossing his arms over the windowsill and gazing toward the camera, Chris seems to address the viewer with a soft smile. Taken in 2015, this photograph is a testament to contemporary park culture and an increasing awareness of the communities that interact with the park. By contrast, earlier representations of Yosemite, like those of the Hudson River School artists, foregrounded the purity and autonomy of the ‘wilderness’ that would become the national park. Still, Chris dons a traditional camp ranger uniform with the “Eisner” hat adopted in 1912 and NPS arrowhead logo made official in 1950, invoking the nostalgia that accompanies notions of the parks.
(Source: lenscratch.com/2016/09/michael-matthew-woodlee-the-states-project-arizona/)

MetaData

Dublin Core

Title

Chris, Campground Ranger, Tuolumne Meadows Campground

Subject

Yosemite,Tuolumne Meadows, photograph

Description

Though passionate about the outdoors, photographer Michael Matthew Woodlee’s interest in national parks lies specifically in the people who inhabit them. His series Yos-e-mite features the workers and volunteers that study and maintain the park. They form their own communities within the spaces, comprising a distinctly human element of the vast natural expanse. He explores how the “Yosemites” shape the culture of the park and how, in turn, the park shapes them. Chris, Campground Ranger, Tuolumne Meadows Campground points an intimate lens toward one such Yosemite worker. Chris, the ranger, stares out from his post at a campsite and fills the center of the photograph. The close framing excludes reference to the famous landscape, which must surround him. By centering Chris’s gaze and cropping the photograph close to his subject, Woodlee puts the viewer in conversation with Chris, asking us to come to know this member of the park community and recognize the integral presence of people, particularly campers, in the park. Crossing his arms over the windowsill and gazing toward the camera, Chris seems to address the viewer with a soft smile. Taken in 2015, this photograph is a testament to contemporary park culture and an increasing awareness of the communities that interact with the park. By contrast, earlier representations of Yosemite, like those of the Hudson River School artists, foregrounded the purity and autonomy of the ‘wilderness’ that would become the national park. Still, Chris dons a traditional camp ranger uniform with the “Eisner” hat adopted in 1912 and NPS arrowhead logo made official in 1950, invoking the nostalgia that accompanies notions of the parks.
(Source: lenscratch.com/2016/09/michael-matthew-woodlee-the-states-project-arizona/)

Creator

Michael Matthew Woodlee, American, 1984-

Source

George Eastman Museum (GEM)

Publisher

N/A

Date

2015

Contributor

Savannah DiGiovanni

Rights

Michael Matthew Woodlee

Relation

Photographs

Format

N/A

Language

En-US

Type

Photograph

Identifier

N/A

Coverage

Alternative Title

Chris, Campground Ranger

Date Created

February 22, 2018

Date Modified

March 16, 2018

Access Rights

Use by permission of the artist

License

N/A

Has Part

N/A

Is Referenced By

N/A

References

N/A

Medium

Inkjet Print

Bibliographic Citation

https://www.artsy.net/artwork/michael-matthew-woodlee-chris-campground-ranger-tuolumne-meadows-campground

Spatial Coverage

Yosemite

Temporal Coverage

21st Century

Accrual Method

N/A

Audience

General Audience

Provenance

N/A

Rights Holder

http://www.michaelmwoodlee.com

Citation

Michael Matthew Woodlee, American, 1984-, “Chris, Campground Ranger, Tuolumne Meadows Campground,” Park Culture, accessed March 5, 2021, http://parkculture.org/items/show/180.

Collection

Geolocation