The New York Earth Room

Description

Walter De Maria was associated with the 1970s Land Art movement. The New York Earth Room is made up 250 cubic yards of earth spread 22 inches deep over 3600 square feet of floor space of an office building in lower Manhattan. The earth is 22 inches deep and it weighs 140 tons. Originally created in 1977, this work has been on view to the public since 1980. This is the third iteration of this work and the only one that still exists.
This work cannot be entered, but must be viewed from the other side of a glass divider that contains the dirt. This piece of glass divides the space into once intended for a human presence and another that is not. When looking at this work, the viewer gazes out at the great expanse of earth, from which they are slightly removed, in a way that in reminiscent of the sublime gaze in early American landscape paintings, such as those of the Hudson River School. Looking at the work, the viewer is awed by the power necessary to create this new type of modern landscape. This work, heavy with the smell of dirt and organic matter, is juxtaposed with the bustle and urbanized environment of Manhattan, directly outside of the earth room. By moving the landscape inside, De Maria challenges conception of interior and exterior spaces. This works show the ability of human power in modern times to disrupt, disturb, and displace the natural world.

MetaData

Dublin Core

Title

The New York Earth Room

Subject

Walter De Maria, Earth Room, New York

Description

Walter De Maria was associated with the 1970s Land Art movement. The New York Earth Room is made up 250 cubic yards of earth spread 22 inches deep over 3600 square feet of floor space of an office building in lower Manhattan. The earth is 22 inches deep and it weighs 140 tons. Originally created in 1977, this work has been on view to the public since 1980. This is the third iteration of this work and the only one that still exists.
This work cannot be entered, but must be viewed from the other side of a glass divider that contains the dirt. This piece of glass divides the space into once intended for a human presence and another that is not. When looking at this work, the viewer gazes out at the great expanse of earth, from which they are slightly removed, in a way that in reminiscent of the sublime gaze in early American landscape paintings, such as those of the Hudson River School. Looking at the work, the viewer is awed by the power necessary to create this new type of modern landscape. This work, heavy with the smell of dirt and organic matter, is juxtaposed with the bustle and urbanized environment of Manhattan, directly outside of the earth room. By moving the landscape inside, De Maria challenges conception of interior and exterior spaces. This works show the ability of human power in modern times to disrupt, disturb, and displace the natural world.

Creator

Walter De Maria, American, 1935-2013

Source

Dia Art Foundation

Publisher

N/A

Date

1977

Contributor

Kathleen Voight

Rights

The Estate of Walter De Maria

Relation

Other Media

Format

60 ft x 60 ft x 22 in.

Language

En-US

Type

Installation

Identifier

1980.135

Coverage

New York, New York

Date Created

February 22, 2018

Date Modified

April 4, 2018

Access Rights

Available to the public for noncommercial, educational, and personal use only, or for fair use as defined by United States copyright laws

License

N/A

Has Part

N/A

Is Referenced By

N/A

References

N/A

Medium

Earth, peat, bark

Bibliographic Citation

https://www.diaart.org/collection/collection/de-maria-walter-the-new-york-earth-room-1977-1980-135/#

Spatial Coverage

New York

Temporal Coverage

20th Century

Audience

General audience

Rights Holder

https://www.diaart.org/footer/terms-of-use

Citation

Walter De Maria, American, 1935-2013, “The New York Earth Room,” Park Culture, accessed March 6, 2021, http://parkculture.org/items/show/187.

Collection

Geolocation