Yaupon Holly

Congaree holly

Description

@congareenps: "The leaves of the Yaupon holly were used to make a tea drink that was a part of Native American purification rituals. European explorers witnessing these ceremonies gave the evergreen shrub the unfortunate scientific name of Ilex vomitoria, due to their belief that it was an emetic. Despite the name, drinking yaupon tea will not make you ill, and was once quite popular. Recent studies have shown that yaupon leaves contain #caffeine and #antioxidants commonly found in #coffee and other teas. Maybe you will see it at your local #coffeeshop in the near future! #FindYourPark #nps #nature"

MetaData

Dublin Core

Title

Yaupon Holly

Subject

Yaupon Holly, Congaree, photograph

Description

@congareenps: "The leaves of the Yaupon holly were used to make a tea drink that was a part of Native American purification rituals. European explorers witnessing these ceremonies gave the evergreen shrub the unfortunate scientific name of Ilex vomitoria, due to their belief that it was an emetic. Despite the name, drinking yaupon tea will not make you ill, and was once quite popular. Recent studies have shown that yaupon leaves contain #caffeine and #antioxidants commonly found in #coffee and other teas. Maybe you will see it at your local #coffeeshop in the near future! #FindYourPark #nps #nature"

Creator

Congaree NPS, 2015

Source

Congaree National Park Service Instagram

Publisher

U.S. National Park Service

Date

2015

Contributor

Lauren Kohler

Rights

Public domain

Relation

Photographs

Format

n/a

Language

En-US

Type

Photograph

Identifier

n/a

Coverage

Congaree

Alternative Title

Congaree holly

Date Created

May 6, 2018

Access Rights

Public domain

License

n/a

Medium

n/a

Bibliographic Citation

https://www.instagram.com/p/9zJHijsfqE/?taken-by=congareenps

Spatial Coverage

Congaree

Temporal Coverage

21st Century

Audience

General audience

Rights Holder

https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/news/photosmultimedia.htm

Citation

Congaree NPS, 2015, “Yaupon Holly ,” Park Culture, accessed March 6, 2021, http://parkculture.org/items/show/246.

Collection

Geolocation